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By Robert Simonson
28 May 2006

 

Michael Emerson
photo by Aubrey Reuben

Michael Emerson, who portrayed Oscar Wilde in Off-Broadway's Gross Indecency, will become a series regular on the hit ABC-TV series "Lost."

This past season, the actor played a recurring character on the show. He began his "Lost" stint on the Feb. 15 broadcast. The "Lost" finale aired on May 24.

Michael Emerson won a 2001 Emmy Award for Best Guest Actor for his work as serial killer William Hinks on "The Practice." He was most recently seen onstage in the New York Theatre Workshop's production of Bach at Leipzig. His other stage credits include Gross Indecency and the Broadway revivals of Hedda Gabler and The Iceman Cometh.

For more information about "Lost," visit http://abc.go.com/primetime/lost.

 

 

 

 Source: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/99909.html








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By Andrew Gans
13 Feb 2006

Emmy Award winner Michael Emerson, who portrayed Oscar Wilde in Off-Broadway's Gross Indecency, has landed a recurring role on the hit ABC-TV series "Lost."

Emerson, according to a spokesperson for the actor, will begin his "Lost" stint on the Feb. 15 broadcast. Emerson is scheduled to appear in at least six additional episodes. "Lost" airs Wednesdays at 9 PM ET on ABC-TV; check local listings.

Michael Emerson won a 2001 Emmy Award for Best Guest Actor for his work as serial killer William Hinks on "The Practice." He was most recently seen onstage in the New York Theatre Workshop's production of Bach at Leipzig. His other stage credits include Gross Indecency and the Broadway revivals of Hedda Gabler and The Iceman Cometh.

For more information about "Lost," visit http://abc.go.com/primetime/lost.

SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/97904.html





 
 

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By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
 
Published: November 15, 2005


"Leipzig, June 1722." That dateline, proclaimed repeatedly in the opening stretches of Itamar Moses' windy play "Bach at Leipzig," may well lodge permanently in the minds of audience members, becoming one of those useless pieces of pseudo-information that plague the idling psyche forever, settling alongside the lyrics of songs you never liked and plot points from episodes of "The Brady Bunch."
 
Carol Rosegg

Michael Emerson, left, and Richard Easton as organists hoping for the big time in "Bach at Leipzig."

 
 

Little else about this ardent but hollow literary homage is likely to make a similarly durable impression, or for that matter a happy one. Sitting through Mr. Moses' reverent attempt to mimic the brainy irreverence of Tom Stoppard is like being forced to consume glass after glass of flat Champagne, with no hope of giddy inebriation in the offing. Inundated with arcana about religious and musical squabbles in 18th-century Germany, besieged by sophomoric jokes, you leave stuffed and queasy but sadly sober.

The play, which opened last night at New York Theater Workshop in a handsome, superbly cast production directed by Pam MacKinnon, bears many of the hallmarks of Mr. Stoppard's erudition-enhanced comedies like "Travesties" or "The Invention of Love," in which stuffy historical or literary figures spring to life and do the hokey-pokey in between shapely little exegeses of big ideas. What's missing is the necessary yeast of true artistic inspiration. The 28-year-old Mr. Moses, clearly a writer of nimble verbal gifts and high ambition, expends much time, energy and vocabulary to say nothing of consequence.

The play is essentially a fictional footnote to an actual footnote in the life of Johann Sebastian Bach. In Leipzig in 1722, Johann Kuhnau, the organist at the city's leading church, played his last fugue. The town council charged with replacing him considered several candidates before settling on the first of classical music's celebrated three B's. As the ill-fated nobodies in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" inspired Mr. Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," so do the bit players in this tale hog center stage in Mr. Moses' early-instruments version of "American Idol" - Bach himself playing the role of a deus ex machina who never arrives.

One by one, in a structure aping the musical form of the fugue, the competitors introduce themselves by reading long letters to various wives, lovers and associates. The innovator Fasch (Boyd Gaines) is a former student of Kuhnau who broke with his mentor over their differing ideas of how to serve God through music. Lenck (Reg Rogers) is a scamp with a spotty past who hopes to restore his reputation and finances by gaining the prestigious post. Steindorff (Jeffrey Carlson) is a sexually voracious young aristocrat from a town at daggers drawn with the neighboring burg, whence hails the dotty older Kaufmann (Richard Easton), yet another candidate. Guarding the door of the church from all comers is the downtrodden Schott (Michael Emerson), the organist at one of Leipzig's lesser churches, who hopes that his chance at the big time has arrived at last.

Plots are hatched, conspiracies are fomented, "Survivor"-style alliances are formed as the candidates try to outmaneuver one another to win the big prize. But for all the fancy machinery of its plotting, the play never works up the farcical energy to sweep us past the dialogue's draggy digressions into learned discourse on the conflicts between the Pietists and the Lutherans, or the intricacy of the fugue form, or the symbiotic relationship between structure and content in drama.

Mr. Moses is particularly ill advised to be lecturing us on that last subject, since the play's needlessly complicated architecture fails to conceal the void of real ideas at its core. These bewigged figures give many pretty-sounding speeches on the aforementioned subjects, but unlike the talkative types in Mr. Stoppard's best plays, they do not espouse or embody philosophies of universal interest or enduring resonance, but remain self-infatuated party guests gabbling on about subjects in which few will have an avid interest.

And while Mr. Stoppard's work can sometimes be top-heavy with book-learnin' - not everyone emerged from the recent Broadway revival of "Jumpers" agog with excitement at his or her new knowledge of metaphysics - he is a great entertainer who orchestrates his tomfoolery with genuine wit. Mr. Moses may someday develop a fine ear for comedy, but "Bach at Leipzig" suggests a serious pitch problem. Considering how frequently the same jokes recur, it's alarming that no one involved in the production seems to have noticed how few are actually funny.

That said, the cast assembled by Ms. MacKinnon includes some seriously skilled comic actors, and each manages to earn a robust laugh or two by tethering the hot-air balloons of their roles to earthy shtick. As the dimwitted Kaufmann, Mr. Easton, resplendent in the most mountainous of wigs (the costumes by Mathew J. LeFebvre are terrific), wanders the stage in a happy daze, oblivious at all times to the plots and counterplots he keeps stumbling upon. Mr. Rogers proves yet again that he is a master at playing craven snivelers. And Mr. Emerson, his blue eyes permanently radiating a deer-in-the-headlights gaze, displays a wonderful gift for graceful physical comedy.

Mr. Moses' affection for his aesthetic mentor is certainly sincere, and Mr. Stoppard has generously reciprocated, giving "Bach at Leipzig" a seal of approval by writing an introduction to the published version. But what's in it for us? For most of the audience, watching "Bach at Leipzig" will be about as rewarding as reading a long, gushy love letter addressed to someone else.

Bach at Leipzig

Text by Itamar Moses; directed by Pam MacKinnon; sets by David Zinn; costumes by Mathew J. LeFebvre; lighting by David Lander; sound by John Gromada; fight choreography by Felix Ivanov; production stage management, C. A. Clark; assistant stage management, Jonathan Donahue. Presented by the New York Theater Workshop, James C. Nicola, artistic director; Lynn Moffat, managing director. At 79 East Fourth Street, East Village; (212) 239-6200. Through Dec. 18. Running time: 2 hours 30 minutes.

WITH: Boyd Gaines (Johann Friedrich Fasch), Michael Emerson (Georg Balthasar Schott), Reg Rogers (Georg Lenck), Richard Easton (Georg Friedrich Kaufmann), Jeffrey Carlson (Johann Martin Steindorff), Andrew Weems (Johann Christoph Graupner) and Jonathan Donahue (the Greatest Organist in Germany).




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By Robert Simonson
03 Jun 2004

Sterling K. Brown, Michael Emerson, and Ciarán O'Reilly will make up the trio of characters in Frank McGuinness' Beirut-set hostage drama Someone Who'll Watch Over Me, the opening attraction in the Westport Country Playhouse abbreviated two-play "on the road" 2004 season.

The storied Playhouse is spending 2004 waiting for its classic barn-theatre home to be modernized and renovated. Its summer shows will be presented at Westport's temporary home at The Ridgefield Playhouse for Movies and the Performing Arts.

Ethan McSweeny will direct the piece. Emerson, a Broadway veteran of The Iceman Cometh and Hedda Gabler, makes his Westport debut. O'Reilly, an Irish Repertory Theatre regular Off-Broadway, appeared at WCT in The Streets of New York, a production that originated at Irish Rep.

In Someone, which played briefly on Broadway a decade back, an American, an Irishman, and an Englishman are imprisoned in Lebanon. While holed up, they form unlikely bonds. Dates are June 24 through July 11.

Next and last in the season is Moliere's The School for Husbands, directed by the busy Doug Hughes (The Beard of Avon, Frozen, Engaged). It will play July 29-Aug. 15.

Also part of the season—and very likely to be its biggest attraction—will be a short run (July 13-15 and July 19-20, with a benefit performance on July 21) of the two-hander bio-play about screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, Trumbo, starring Gordon MacDonald and Paul Newman. Newman starred in Westport biggest hit in recent years, the Broadway transfer of Our Town.

The not-for-profit Westport Country Playhouse will re-open in 2005, its 75th anniversary. For 2004 subscription information, call (203) 226-0153. For a complete 2004 season schedule and directions to the various temporary venues visit www.westportplayhouse.org.

 

SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/86544.html



 

 

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01 Aug 2002

Michael Emerson, Stephen Belber and Katie Firth will lend their skills to the American premiere of French playwright Jean Luc Legarce's poignant swan song, Only the End of the World. The play will be presented by Company Charniere in association with Sherri Kotimsky at Off-Broadway's Theatre 3, Aug. 1-24.

Michael Emerson, Stephen Belber and Katie Firth will lend their skills to the American premiere of French playwright Jean Luc Legarce's poignant swan song, Only the End of the World. The play will be presented by Company Charniere in association with Sherri Kotimsky at Off-Broadway's Theatre 3, Aug. 1-24.

Legarce wrote End of the World in 1990, four years after he was diagnosed with AIDS. He died in 1995. The play is considered autobiographical. It concerns a man's return to his hometown and family. He wants to tell them about the illness that will kill him. But his arrival unearths so many repressed grievances that he is forced to sit quietly while his mother and siblings unpack and air the anger and sorrow built up over many years. Finally, he leaves without having accomplished his task.

Company Charniere produced Finally, which was written by Belber and starred Firth. Firth was more recently seen in the Keen Company's production of Museum. Emerson was Oscar Wilde in Gross Indecency and last season played opposite Kate Burton in Hedda Gabler. Also in the cast are Sandra Shipley, of the Roundabout's The Deep Blue Sea and Arms and the Man; and Jennifer Mudge. Lucie Tiberghien directs.

Tickets are $15. Theatre 3 is located at 311 W. 43rd St. For information, call (212) 252-4437.

—By Robert Simonson

SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/70695.html


 

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11 Oct 2001

 

 
photo by Photo by Aubrey Reuben

Kate Burton isn't the only star in Hedda Gabler — the Broadway revival also features Michael Emerson (Gross Indecencies), Jennifer Van Dyck (Dancing at Lughnasa) and Harris Yulin (The Price, The Diary of Anne Frank).

Kate Burton isn't the only star in Hedda Gabler — the Broadway revival also features Michael Emerson (Gross Indecencies), Jennifer Van Dyck (Dancing at Lughnasa) and Harris Yulin (The Price, The Diary of Anne Frank).

Kate Burton stars as Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, a Norse gal with a gripe and a gun. Under Nicholas Martin's direction, she is trapped and frustrated by the bourgeois world into which she finds herself married. Populating that world are the likes of her ineffectual, academic husband Tesman (Emerson) and the devilish Judge Brack (Yulin). Rounding out the cast are David Lansbury, Maria Cellario, Van Dyck and Angela Thornton. Hedda has been adapted by Jon Robin Baitz.

 

 



SOURCE:   http://www.playbill.com/news/article/62638.html





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02 Oct 2001

 

 
photo by Photo by Aubrey Reuben

Maybe they aren't known as singers, but many of Broadway's plays turned out to warble "New York, New York" for the new "I Love NY Theatre" TV commercial. Among them, Hedda Gabler's Michael Emerson, Kate Burton and David Lansbury (the latter two come with musical genes — Kate is Richard's daughter and David is Angela's nephew).

Maybe they aren't known as singers, but many of Broadway's plays turned out to warble "New York, New York" for the new "I Love NY Theatre" TV commercial. Among them, Hedda Gabler's Michael Emerson, Kate Burton and David Lansbury (the latter two come with musical genes — Kate is Richard's daughter and David is Angela's nephew).

The casts of approximately 30 Broadway shows—from the past, present and future—gathered in Times Square on Sept. 28 to shoot a new television spot. The ad is the broadcast centerpiece of The League of American Theatres and Producers' ambitious marketing campaign designed to win back the tourist audience, which has resolutely avoided Manhattan's theatre world since two hijacked jumbo jets struck the twin towers of the World Trade Center.

SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/62445.html





  
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10 Sep 2001

The cast of the acclaimed new staging of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler, is fully loaded. Joining the already announced Kate Burton are, as expected, Harris Yulin, Michael Emerson and David Lansbury. Rounding out the cast are Maria Cellario, Jennifer Van Dyck and Angela Thornton. Hedda has been adapted by Jon Robin Baitz and is directed by Nicholas. The play will open Oct. 4 at the Ambassador Theatre.

The cast of the acclaimed new staging of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler, is fully loaded. Joining the already announced Kate Burton are, as expected, Harris Yulin, Michael Emerson and David Lansbury. Rounding out the cast are Maria Cellario, Jennifer Van Dyck and Angela Thornton. Hedda has been adapted by Jon Robin Baitz and is directed by Nicholas. The play will open Oct. 4 at the Ambassador Theatre.

Hedda comes off a much-acclaimed run in Boston, where it opened Jan. 3 to rosy reviews from the usually tough Boston Globe and Boston Herald. The show began life at the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Emerson, Yulin and Lansbury were featured in Boston, repeating performances they played in Williamstown, as well as at the Bay Street Theatre in Long Island. They play Tesman, Judge Brack and Lovborg, respectively.

Producing Hedda Gabler on Broadway are Randall L. Wreghitt, Harriet Newman Leve, Gallin Productions and USA Ostar Theatricals, in association with Bay Street Theatre, Huntington Theatre Company and Williamstown Theatre Festival, with Jennifer Manocherian, Mary Lu Roffe, Cheryl Wiesenfeld and Temple Gill serving as associate producers. Performances begin Sept. 19.

Designing the show are Alexander Dodge (set), Michael Krass (costumes), Kevin Adams (lighting) and Jerry Yager (sound). Peter Golub will contribute original music to the piece.

*

As reported earlier by PBOL, Hedda had wanted to open on Broadway this past spring, but opted for a fall 2001 bow instead. "Initially, we were hoping we'd finish up here and literally come in [to New York] at the beginning of February," Burton told Playbill On-Line (Jan. 5). A lack of available Broadway theatres, however, threw a wrench into that timetable. "The fall is looking more and more like a wonderful time," said Burton. "When we do it we want to do it right. We want to do it with enough lead time." (A summer run was not feasible, since Burton spends the season with her husband, Michael Richie, producer of the June-to- September Williamstown Theatre Festival.)

Actress Burton was last seen on the New York stage in Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do!. Adaptor Baitz also penned Three Hotels and Mizlansky/Zilinsky. Director Martin staged the Off Broadway hits Fully Committed and Full Gallop. Author Ibsen also wrote A Doll's House and When We Dead Awaken.

For tickets ($30-$70) and information on Hedda Gabler at the Ambassador Theatre, 219 West 49th St., call (212) 239-6200.

—By Robert Simonson

SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/62063.html
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13 Jun 2001

 

 
photo by Photo by Aubrey Reuben

Chaucer in Rome castmates Lee Wilkof and Carrie Preston celebrated the opening of John Guare's latest June 7 with Gross Indecency's Michael Emerson and Wilkof's wife.

Chaucer in Rome castmates Lee Wilkof and Carrie Preston celebrated the opening of John Guare's latest June 7 with Gross Indecency's Michael Emerson and Wilkof's wife.

Chaucer in Rome boasts a typically theatrical, absurdist Guare plot, in which the story of a painter trying to find himself in the Eternal City is matched with the tale of a Queens family searching for their son, all during the last year of the past millennium. The story is said to be a sequel of sorts to Guare's The House of Blue Leaves and includes the son of one of the earlier play's characters. Chaucer in Rome, directed by Nicholas Martin, runs at Lincoln Center Theater's Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater.




SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/60747.html







 
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29 Dec 2000

 

Kate Burton in Hedda Gabler.
photo by Photo by Richard Feldman

Repeating roles they created at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Kate Burton, Michael Emerson, David Lansbury and Harris Yulin will star in the Huntington Theatre Company production of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler. They will play Hedda, Tesman, Lovborg and Judge Brack, respectively. The show begins previews Dec. 29 and runs through Jan. 28, 2001 with an opening on Jan. 3.

Repeating roles they created at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Kate Burton, Michael Emerson, David Lansbury and Harris Yulin will star in the Huntington Theatre Company production of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler. They will play Hedda, Tesman, Lovborg and Judge Brack, respectively. The show begins previews Dec. 29 and runs through Jan. 28, 2001 with an opening on Jan. 3.

Burton was last seen on the New York stage in Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do!. Emerson has become a mainstay in New York theatre in recent years, emerging in the title role in Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde, and going on to co-star in Give Me Your Answer, Do! and The Iceman Cometh. Lansbury's credits include Hapgood at Lincoln Center Theater. Yulin (The Diary of Anne Frank), a veteran with over 40 years experience, last appeared on Broadway in The Price..

Burton will reprise the title role of Hedda, having performed it this summer at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, as well as the Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor, Long Island. Also in the Boston cast are Jennifer Van Dyck (the Huntington's recent hit production of Dead End) and Maria Cellario. Nicholas Martin directs.

For weeks, plans have been afoot to transfer the production to Broadway. Producer Randall L. Wreghitt told Playbill On-Line (Dec. 15) that even if a Broadway theatre logjam bars Hedda from New York in the spring, "Both Kate [Burton] and I want to do it. No matter what. It's not a `summer show,' but we'll wait for a theatre because we want to bring it in."

Seeking a measure of happiness that Ibsen himself said the title character "cannot discover," despite many chances to do so, Hedda Gabler will go to any lengths to escape from a stifling everyday routine and to get past her marriage to Tesman, a mediocre and self-satisfied scholar.

For Hedda Gabler, tickets range from $12-$55. For tickets or information call the Huntington box office at (617) 266-0800 or visit www.huntingtontheatre.org.

—By Robert Simonson and Murdoch McBride

SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/57627.html
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28 Nov 2000

Repeating roles they created at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Michael Emerson, David Lansbury and Harris Yulin will star in the upcoming Huntington Theatre Company production of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler. They will play Tesman, Lovborg and Judge Brack, respectively.

Repeating roles they created at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Michael Emerson, David Lansbury and Harris Yulin will star in the upcoming Huntington Theatre Company production of Ibsen's classic, Hedda Gabler. They will play Tesman, Lovborg and Judge Brack, respectively.

The show begins previews Dec. 29 and runs through Jan. 28, 2001 with an opening on Jan. 3.

Emerson has become a mainstay in New York theatre in recent years, emerging in the title role in Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde, and going on to co-star in Give Me Your Answer, Do! and The Iceman Cometh. Lansbury's credits include Hapgood at Lincoln Center Theater. Yulin (The Diary of Anne Frank), a veteran with over 40 years experience, last appeared on Broadway in The Price..

As previously reported, Kate Burton will reprise the title role of Hedda, having performed it this summer at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, as well as the Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor, Long Island. Also in the Boston cast are Jennifer Van Dyck (the Huntington's recent hit production of Dead End) and Maria Cellario. Nicholas Martin directs.

For weeks, plans have been afoot to transfer the production to Broadway. Producer Randall L. Wreghitt told Playbill On-Line (Dec. 15) that even if a Broadway theatre logjam bars Hedda from New York in the spring, "Both Kate [Burton] and I want to do it. No matter what. It's not a `summer show,' but we'll wait for a theatre because we want to bring it in."

Seeking a measure of happiness that Ibsen himself said the title character "cannot discover," despite many chances to do so, Hedda Gabler will go to any lengths to escape from a stifling everyday routine and to get past her marriage to Tesman, a mediocre and self-satisfied scholar.

*

Huntington Theatre Company artistic director Nicholas Martin and managing director Michael Mason have announced several changes to the company's 2000-2001 season.

Henrik Ibsen's 1891 masterpiece Hedda Gabler was added to the company's 2000-2001 season earlier this fall, and will be presented from Dec. 29-Jan. 28.

The translation is by Jon Robin Baitz. Baitz' A Fair Country was recently seen at the Huntington, closing Nov. 26.

Among the other changes at the Huntington are the rescheduling of Moliere's Amphitryon, which will move from the slot now designated for Hedda Gabler and into next year's March 9- April 8 slot.

Tom Stoppard's The Invention of Love, meanwhile, has been rescheduled for the 2001-2002 season.

Huntington's 2000-2001 season wraps up with James Baldwin's The Amen Corner, which will run from May 18 - June 17, 2001.

Huntington's Nicholas Martin, who will direct Hedda Gabler there, explained that the desire to keep the Hedda Gabler cast intact from earlier productions this year made it necessary to move up the booking, which caused a rippling effect in the season plans.

For Hedda Gabler, tickets range from $12-$55. For tickets or information call the Huntington box office at (617) 266-0800 or visit www.huntingtontheatre.org.

—By Robert Simonson and Murdoch McBride

SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/57027.html
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08 Jul 1999

Tony and Oscar-winning star of the original Cabaret, Joey Grey, will play alongside Kate Burton, John Glover and Michael Emerson in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do!, to be mounted by The Roundabout Theatre Company. The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

Tony and Oscar-winning star of the original Cabaret, Joey Grey, will play alongside Kate Burton, John Glover and Michael Emerson in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do!, to be mounted by The Roundabout Theatre Company. The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

The play is set in Donegal, Ireland where novelist Tom Connolly and wife Daisy nervously await the decision of their American houseguest as to whether he will purchase Tom's papers for a U.S. college library -- a deal which would offer some compensation for Tom's recent literary paralysis.

Although Grey recently appeared as Mr. Cellophane in the revival of Chicago, he hasn't officially starred in a play since Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart in 1985.

Tony and OBIE winning actor Glover won his awards for playing not one but two roles as twins in both the stage and screen versions of Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion!.

Though Michael Emerson is currently featured in the ensemble for The Iceman Cometh, audiences may be more familiar with him through his performance as the original Oscar Wilde in the long-running OB hit, Gross Indecencies.

Kate Burton stepped in for the final weeks of Beauty Queen of Leenane for Marie Mullen. She also replaced Kate Nelligan in An American Daughter. Burton's other credits include: Company, Jake's Women, Some Americans Abroad (Drama Desk Nomination),Wild Honey, Doonesbury, Alice in Wonderland, and Present Laughter (a role for which she won a Theatre World Award).

Kyle Donnelly, a former Associate Artistic Director of Arena Stage, has been signed to direct. With Answer, The Roundabout continues its relationship with Friel, having previously produced the American premiere of Friel's Molly Sweeney and a revival of Philadelphia, Here I Come!. Other plays by Friel include the 1992 Tony Award-winning best play, Dancing at Lughnasa, Lovers, The Mundy Scheme, The Loves of Cass McGuire, Faith Healer, Aristocrats, Wonderful Tennessee and The Freedom of the City.

The design team for Answer includes Tom Lynch (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes), and Kenneth Posner (lighting).

[Other big news for Friel: The Abbey Theatre and Gate Theatre of Ireland is staging a three-play, Brian Friel mini-festival at Lincoln Center's Summer Festival, July 6-25. The Gate is mounting Friel's translation of Uncle Vanya and his 1979 drama, Aristocrats. The Abbey, meanwhile, serves up the 1973 play, The Freedom of the City.]

*

Along with the previously announced Off-Broadway Give Me Your Answer, Do! starring Joel Grey and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, the Roundabout Theatre Company is currently telling subscription members that the following plays are under consideration for their 1999-2000 season:

* The Glimmer Brothers by Warren (Side Man) Leight, directed by Scott Ellis. In Glimmer, Warren Leight, author of this year's Tony Award-winning Best Play, returns to the world of music in this poignant family drama. The play tells of Daniel and Martin Glimmer, twin brothers once united in their love of jazz but now long estranged. When Martin lands in the hospital, his godson Jordan and Daniel's daughter Delia try to bring the two brothers back together. Glimmer has a world premiere run at The Williamstown Theatre Festival, July 14-25, in a production starring David Schwimmer (TV's "Friends," "Six Days, Seven Nights," and "The Pallbearer"), John Spencer, Terry Beaver and Kim Raver. Leight already has a successful history with the Roundabout. Side Man had been playing at CSC in downtown Manhattan before the Roundabout picked it to fill the space in its season that was to have gone to a failed Bacharach-David musical revue.

* Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill, directed by David Leveaux. O'Neill's classic 1920s drama chronicles a New England farm family and their degeneration into adultery and greed. The play was brought up on obscenity charges during its original Broadway run, but the jury found O'Neill innocent. The Tony Award-winning Leveaux recently directed Pinter's Moonlight for The Roundabout, with Broadway credits including: O'Neill's Anna Christiewith Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson (Tony Award for Best Revival) and A Moon for the Misbegotten (Tony nomination for Outstanding Direction).

* You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy was first staged in 1936 and follows an eccentric household where each family member creates his own chaos. The play was later made into an Academy Award-winning film. * Hotel Suite by Neil Simon, directed by Rob Marshall, is an amalgam of Simon's previous "Suite" plays, combining four one-acts from his California Suite, London Suite, and Plaza Suite. After premiering in London in 1997, the play was produced earlier this year at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre, where it starred Marina Sirtis (of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"). Hotel Suite's four scenes, are, in order: Visitors from London from California Suite, about an Oscar-nominated English actress and her husband; Visitor from Philadelphia, also from California Suite, about a couple from Philly, one of whom wakes up with a stranger; Diana and Sydney from London Suite, a second look at the English couple of the first scene; and Visitor from Mamaroneck from Plaza Suite, about a bride with pre wedding jitters.

A spokesperson for the Roundabout could not confirm whether any of the above plays would be part of the new season.

-- By Sean McGrath

SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/46545.html
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05 Oct 1999

 

Kate Burton in Give Me Your Answer, Do!.
photo by Photo by Joan Marcus

Roundabout Theatre Company's American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do will opens Oct. 5. Friel's play stars Joey Grey (Cabaret), Lois Smith, Kate Burton, Gawn Grainger, Helen Carey, John Glover and Michael Emerson.

Roundabout Theatre Company's American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do will opens Oct. 5. Friel's play stars Joey Grey (Cabaret), Lois Smith, Kate Burton, Gawn Grainger, Helen Carey, John Glover and Michael Emerson.

With Answer, Do! Roundabout continues its relationship with Friel, having previously presented the American premiere of Friel's Molly Sweeney and a revival of Philadelphia, Here I Come!.

Other plays by Friel include the 1992 Tony Award-winning best play, Dancing at Lughnasa, Lovers, The Mundy Scheme, The Loves of Cass McGuire, Faith Healer, Aristocrats, Wonderful Tennessee and The Freedom of the City.

Answer, Do! is set in Donegal, Ireland, where novelist Tom Connolly and wife Daisy nervously await the decision of their houseguest as to whether he will purchase Tom's papers for a U.S. college library -- a deal which would offer some compensation following Tom's literary paralysis.

In terms of the cast, Answer, Do! marks the return to the spotlight of Tony and Academy Award-winner, Joel Grey. Although Grey recently appeared as Mr. Cellophane in Chicago, he hasn't officially starred in a play since Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart in 1985.

Tony and OBIE-winning actor Glover won his awards for playing not one but two roles as twins in both the stage and screen versions of Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion!.

Though Michael Emerson was recently featured in the ensemble of The Iceman Cometh, audiences may be more familiar with him through his performance as the original Oscar Wilde in the long-running Off-Broadway hit, Gross Indecencies.

Kate Burton stepped in for the final weeks of Beauty Queen of Leenane for Marie Mullen. She also replaced Kate Nelligan in An American Daughter. Burton's other credits include Company, Jake's Women, Some Americans Abroad (Drama Desk Nomination),Wild Honey, Doonesbury, Alice in Wonderland, and Present Laughter (a role for which she won a Theatre World Award).

Kyle Donnelly, a former Associate Artistic Director of Arena Stage, directs. The design team for Answer includes Tom Lynch (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes), and Kenneth Posner (lighting).

Along with Give Me Your Answer, Do! and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, the Roundabout Theatre Company has also informed subscription members that the following plays are under consideration for their 1999-2000 season:

Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill, directed by David Leveaux. O'Neill's classic 1920s drama chronicles a New England farm family and their degeneration into adultery and greed. The play was brought up on obscenity charges during its original Broadway run, but the jury found O'Neill innocent. The Tony Award-winning Leveaux recently directed Pinter's Moonlight for The Roundabout, with Broadway credits including: O'Neill's Anna Christie with Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson (Tony Award for Best Revival) and A Moon for the Misbegotten.

You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy was first staged in 1936 and follows an eccentric household where each family member creates his own chaos. The play was later made into an Academy Award-winning film. Director Nicholas Martin has told Playbill On-Line that he will be directing the show, but a Roundabout spokesperson could not confirm the report at press time.

Hotel Suite by Neil Simon, directed by Rob Marshall, is an amalgam of Simon's previous "Suite" plays, combining four one-acts from his California Suite, London Suite, and Plaza Suite. After premiering in London in 1997, the play was produced earlier this year at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre, where it starred Marina Sirtis (of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"). In Philly, Hotel Suite's four scenes, were, in order: Visitors from London from California Suite, about an Oscar nominated English actress and her husband; Visitor from Philadelphia, also from California Suite, about a couple from Philly, one of whom wakes up with a stranger; Diana and Sydney from London Suite, a second look at the English couple of the first scene; and Visitor from Mamaroneck from Plaza Suite, about a bride with pre-wedding jitters.

Another play previously reported as being under consideration, Warren Leight's The Glimmer Brothers, is no longer on the Roundabout roster, according to Variety. Reportedly, Leight wants to do some additional work on the drama, which was recently produced by the Williamstown Theatre Festival.

-- By Murdoch McBride


SOURCE:   http://www.playbill.com/news/article/48180.htm
m_emerson_news: (Default)
03 Aug 1999

Lois Smith has signed on to The Roundabout Theatre Company to appear in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do! alongside Joey Grey (Cabaret), Kate Burton, Gawn Grainger, Helen Carey, John Glover and Michael Emerson. The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

Lois Smith has signed on to The Roundabout Theatre Company to appear in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do! alongside Joey Grey (Cabaret), Kate Burton, Gawn Grainger, Helen Carey, John Glover and Michael Emerson. The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

Smith is a longtime member of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre where she appeared in the award-winning productions Buried Child and Grapes of Wrath -- both productions later transferred to Broadway. Recently, she appeared in Beth Henley's Impossible Marriage, also at the Roundabout.

The play is set in Donegal, Ireland, where novelist Tom Connolly and wife Daisy nervously await the decision of their houseguest as to whether he will purchase Tom's papers for a U.S. college library -- a deal which would offer some compensation for Tom's recent literary paralysis.

Answer, Do! will mark the return to the spotlight of Tony and Academy Award-winner, Joel Grey. Although Grey has recently appeared as Mr. Cellophane in Chicago, he hasn't officially starred in a play since Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart in 1985.

Tony and OBIE winning actor Glover won his awards for playing not one but two roles as twins in both the stage and screen versions of Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion!.

Though Michael Emerson was recently featured in the ensemble of The Iceman Cometh, audiences may be more familiar with him through his performance as the original Oscar Wilde in the long-running OB hit, Gross Indecencies.

Kate Burton stepped in for the final weeks of Beauty Queen of Leenane for Marie Mullen. She also replaced Kate Nelligan in An American Daughter. Burton's other credits include: Company, Jake's Women, Some Americans Abroad (Drama Desk Nomination),Wild Honey, Doonesbury, Alice in Wonderland, and Present Laughter (a role for which she won a Theatre World Award).

Kyle Donnelly, a former Associate Artistic Director of Arena Stage, has been signed to direct. With Answer, The Roundabout continues its relationship with Friel, having previously produced the American premiere of Friel's Molly Sweeney and a revival of Philadelphia, Here I Come!. Other plays by Friel include the 1992 Tony Award-winning best play, Dancing at Lughnasa, Lovers, The Mundy Scheme, The Loves of Cass McGuire, Faith Healer, Aristocrats, Wonderful Tennessee and The Freedom of the City.

The design team for Answer includes Tom Lynch (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes), and Kenneth Posner (lighting).

*

Along with Give Me Your Answer, Do! and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, the Roundabout Theatre Company is currently telling subscription members that the following plays are under consideration for their 1999-2000 season:

The Glimmer Brothers by Warren (Side Man) Leight, directed by Scott Ellis. In Glimmer, Leight, author of this year's Tony Award winning Best Play, returns to the world of music in this poignant family drama. The play tells of Daniel and Martin Glimmer, twin brothers once united in their love of jazz but now long estranged. When Martin lands in the hospital, his godson Jordan and Daniel's daughter Delia try to bring the two brothers back together. Glimmer has a world premiere run at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, July 14-25, in a production starring David Schwimmer (TV's "Friends," "Six Days, Seven Nights," and "The Pallbearer"), Jon Spencer, Terry Beaver and Kim Raver. Leight already has a successful history with the Roundabout. Side Man had been playing at CSC in downtown Manhattan before the Roundabout picked it to fill the space in its season that was to have gone to a Bacharach-David musical revue.

Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill, directed by David Leveaux. O'Neill's classic 1920s drama chronicles a New England farm family and their degeneration into adultery and greed. The play was brought up on obscenity charges during its original Broadway run, but the jury found O'Neill innocent. The Tony Award-winning Leveaux recently directed Pinter's Moonlight for The Roundabout, with Broadway credits including: O'Neill's Anna Christie with Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson (Tony Award for Best Revival) and A Moon for the Misbegotten (Tony nomination for Outstanding Direction).

You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy was first staged in 1936 and follows an eccentric household where each family member creates his own chaos. The play was later made into an Academy Award-winning film.

Hotel Suite by Neil Simon, directed by Rob Marshall, is an amalgam of Simon's previous "Suite" plays, combining four one-acts from his California Suite, London Suite, and Plaza Suite. After premiering in London in 1997, the play was produced earlier this year at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre, where it starred Marina Sirtis (of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"). In Philly, Hotel Suite's four scenes, were, in order: Visitors from London from California Suite, about an Oscar nominated English actress and her husband; Visitor from Philadelphia, also from California Suite, about a couple from Philly, one of whom wakes up with a stranger; Diana and Sydney from London Suite, a second look at the English couple of the first scene; and Visitor from Mamaroneck from Plaza Suite, about a bride with pre wedding jitters.

-- By Sean McGrath

SOURCE:   http://www.playbill.com/news/article/47020.html
m_emerson_news: (Default)
29 Jul 1999

Lois Smith is reportedly in negotiations with The Roundabout Theatre Company to appear in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do! alongside Joey Grey (Cabaret), Kate Burton, John Glover and Michael Emerson. A production spokesperson for The Roundabout confirmed (July 29) that "an offer has been made," but that nothing was signed.The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

Lois Smith is reportedly in negotiations with The Roundabout Theatre Company to appear in the American premiere of Brian Friel's Give Me Your Answer, Do! alongside Joey Grey (Cabaret), Kate Burton, John Glover and Michael Emerson. A production spokesperson for The Roundabout confirmed (July 29) that "an offer has been made," but that nothing was signed.The production begins previews Sept. 10 for a Sept. 30 opening.

Smith is a longtime member of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre where she appeared in the award-winning productions Buried Child and Grapes of Wrath -- both productions later transferred to Broadway. Recently, she appeared in Beth Henley's Impossible Marriage, also at the Roundabout.

The play is set in Donegal, Ireland, where novelist Tom Connolly and wife Daisy nervously await the decision of their houseguest as to whether he will purchase Tom's papers for a U.S. college library -- a deal which would offer some compensation for Tom's recent literary paralysis.

Answer, Do! will mark the return to the spotlight of Tony and Academy Award-winner, Joel Grey. Although Grey has recently appeared as Mr. Cellophane in Chicago, he hasn't officially starred in a play since Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart in 1985.

Tony and OBIE winning actor Glover won his awards for playing not one but two roles as twins in both the stage and screen versions of Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion!.

Though Michael Emerson was recently featured in the ensemble of The Iceman Cometh, audiences may be more familiar with him through his performance as the original Oscar Wilde in the long-running OB hit, Gross Indecencies.

Kate Burton stepped in for the final weeks of Beauty Queen of Leenane for Marie Mullen. She also replaced Kate Nelligan in An American Daughter. Burton's other credits include: Company, Jake's Women, Some Americans Abroad (Drama Desk Nomination),Wild Honey, Doonesbury, Alice in Wonderland, and Present Laughter (a role for which she won a Theatre World Award).

Kyle Donnelly, a former Associate Artistic Director of Arena Stage, has been signed to direct. With Answer, The Roundabout continues its relationship with Friel, having previously produced the American premiere of Friel's Molly Sweeney and a revival of Philadelphia, Here I Come!. Other plays by Friel include the 1992 Tony Award-winning best play, Dancing at Lughnasa, Lovers, The Mundy Scheme, The Loves of Cass McGuire, Faith Healer, Aristocrats, Wonderful Tennessee and The Freedom of the City.

The design team for Answer includes Tom Lynch (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes), and Kenneth Posner (lighting).

*

Along with Give Me Your Answer, Do! and the Broadway revival of The Rainmaker, starring Woody Harrelson, the Roundabout Theatre Company is currently telling subscription members that the following plays are under consideration for their 1999-2000 season:

The Glimmer Brothers by Warren (Side Man) Leight, directed by Scott Ellis. In Glimmer, Leight, author of this year's Tony Award winning Best Play, returns to the world of music in this poignant family drama. The play tells of Daniel and Martin Glimmer, twin brothers once united in their love of jazz but now long estranged. When Martin lands in the hospital, his godson Jordan and Daniel's daughter Delia try to bring the two brothers back together. Glimmer has a world premiere run at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, July 14-25, in a production starring David Schwimmer (TV's "Friends," "Six Days, Seven Nights," and "The Pallbearer"), Jon Spencer, Terry Beaver and Kim Raver. Leight already has a successful history with the Roundabout. Side Man had been playing at CSC in downtown Manhattan before the Roundabout picked it to fill the space in its season that was to have gone to a Bacharach-David musical revue.

Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill, directed by David Leveaux. O'Neill's classic 1920s drama chronicles a New England farm family and their degeneration into adultery and greed. The play was brought up on obscenity charges during its original Broadway run, but the jury found O'Neill innocent. The Tony Award-winning Leveaux recently directed Pinter's Moonlight for The Roundabout, with Broadway credits including: O'Neill's Anna Christie with Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson (Tony Award for Best Revival) and A Moon for the Misbegotten (Tony nomination for Outstanding Direction).

You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy was first staged in 1936 and follows an eccentric household where each family member creates his own chaos. The play was later made into an Academy Award-winning film.

Hotel Suite by Neil Simon, directed by Rob Marshall, is an amalgam of Simon's previous "Suite" plays, combining four one-acts from his California Suite, London Suite, and Plaza Suite. After premiering in London in 1997, the play was produced earlier this year at Philadelphia's Walnut Street Theatre, where it starred Marina Sirtis (of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"). In Philly, Hotel Suite's four scenes, were, in order: Visitors from London from California Suite, about an Oscar nominated English actress and her husband; Visitor from Philadelphia, also from California Suite, about a couple from Philly, one of whom wakes up with a stranger; Diana and Sydney from London Suite, a second look at the English couple of the first scene; and Visitor from Mamaroneck from Plaza Suite, about a bride with pre wedding jitters.

-- By Sean McGrath

SOURCE: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/46947.html
m_emerson_news: (Default)
14 May 1999

The Iceman Cometh actors Michael Emerson and Tim Pigott-Smith and Side Man playwright Warren Leight and director Michael Mayer will be the guests on the May 14 episode of "Theater Talk," the theater talk show on Thirteen/WNET in New York.

The Iceman Cometh actors Michael Emerson and Tim Pigott-Smith and Side Man playwright Warren Leight and director Michael Mayer will be the guests on the May 14 episode of "Theater Talk," the theater talk show on Thirteen/WNET in New York.

British Pigott-Smith and American Emerson discuss their work on the play, now playing on Broadway. They will also talk about working with its director Howard Davies and star Kevin Spacey.

Also on Broadway is Side Man. Leight and Mayer will discuss how they worked together on the drama. Both Side Man and Iceman are nominated for several Tony Awards.

This episode of "Theater Talk" will air Friday, May 14, at midnight on Thirteen/WNET and re-air Saturday, May 15, at 9:30 PM as part of Thirteen MetroArts on MetroLearning cable.

-- By Robert Simonson

SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/45470.html
   

 
m_emerson_news: (Default)
10 Feb 1999

 

Katie Finneran in Signature's Bosoms and Neglect
photo by Photo by Susan Johann

Michael Emerson, who originated the role of Oscar Wilde in the Off Broadway smash Gross Indecency, and Katie Finneran, who received acclaim for her neurotic Deirdre in Signature Theatre Company's recent revival of Bosoms and Neglect, have both been added to the roster of The Iceman Cometh, which has finished casting and starts previews March 29 for an opening April 8.

Michael Emerson, who originated the role of Oscar Wilde in the Off Broadway smash Gross Indecency, and Katie Finneran, who received acclaim for her neurotic Deirdre in Signature Theatre Company's recent revival of Bosoms and Neglect, have both been added to the roster of The Iceman Cometh, which has finished casting and starts previews March 29 for an opening April 8.

Kevin Spacey stars as Hickey, alongside Robert Sean Leonard, Paul Giamatti and London cast originals: Tim Pigott Smith, James Hazeldine, and Patrick Godfrey, all under the helm of Howard Davies. Tony Danza returns to the Great White Way to appear as Rocky the Bartender in the star-studded revival, which will run only 98 performances at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre.

Newly announced performers include Ed Dixon (The Scarlet Pimpernel), Clarke Peters, Tim Pigott Smith, Richard Riehle, Stephen Singer, Dina Spybey, Skipp Sudduth and Jeff Weiss.

In London, the hit O'Neill drama opened at the Old Vic on June 19, 1998 for a run through Aug. 1. The Almeida Theatre production, directed by Howard Davies (Almeida's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), was greeted with ecstatic reviews and sold-out performances upon opening. Spacey recently received the London Critics' Drama Award for his performance, while Davies won for his direction. Both also won the same trophies at the November 1998 Evening Standard Theatre Awards. Furthermore, both Spacey and Davies have been nominated for London theatre's top prize, the Olivier Awards, to be presented Feb. 12.

Producing the drama on Broadway are Allan S. Gordon, Bill Haber, Ira Pittelman, Elan McCallister, Trigger Street Productions and Emanuel Azenberg.

The Iceman Cometh concerns the deluded pipe dreams of characters at Harry Hope's saloon who are confronted by Hickey (Spacey), a man who has broken free of his dreams and seeks to lead the others to do the same. Things come undone, however, when the reason for Hickey's transformation becomes known.

The Iceman Cometh is the third, star-studded Almeida production to enjoy a West End run this season. Having opened Apr. 2, it followed David Hare's The Judas Kiss, starring Liam Neeson, and Pirandello's Naked, with Juliette Binoche.

*

Although best-known for his work in films such as "The Usual Suspects" (for which he won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor), "Seven," "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" and "L.A. Confidential," Kevin Spacey's theatre credits are numerous. Broadway appearances have included Ibsen's Ghosts, O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night and Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers for which he won a Tony award in 1991.

Though best-known for his television work with "Who's the Boss," and "Taxi," Danza made his Broadway debut last year, taking over the lead in A View from the Bridge from Anthony LaPaglia, receiving largely positive reviews. Danza's Broadway stay was short lived, however, as View failed to find an audience and soon closed.

Giamatti appeared on Broadway in a star-studded 1997 Three Sisters, but his most recognizable role to date was as "Pig Vomit" in the Howard Stern film, "Private Parts."

Sean Leonard is a frequent theatre presence in New York, appearing in Candida, You Never Can Tell and Philadelphia, Here I Come!.

For tickets and information on The Iceman Cometh at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre call (212) 307-4100.

    
SOURCE:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/43570.html
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30 Jul 1998

Edward Hibbert returned his Oscar Wilde role in Gross Indecency to its originator, Michael Emerson, then visited family in London for a week, then flew to Los Angeles to do three days of ABC-TV promotion and is now poised to start lensing in Hawaii, at the beginning of August, the first 12 episodes of a new "Fantasy Island" that the network is activating.

Edward Hibbert returned his Oscar Wilde role in Gross Indecency to its originator, Michael Emerson, then visited family in London for a week, then flew to Los Angeles to do three days of ABC-TV promotion and is now poised to start lensing in Hawaii, at the beginning of August, the first 12 episodes of a new "Fantasy Island" that the network is activating.

Ricardo Montalbam could not be persuaded to make this return trip so his role function is being filled by Malcolm McDowell. Hibbert -- best-known to Off-Broadway audiences as that impeccable Brit, Stirling, in Paul Rudnick's Jeffrey -- will co-star as a snooty character not in the original series: namely, the concierge of Fantasy Island Hotel. "A bit of class, some good suits and some good dialogue," is Hibbert's deft way of summing up his new role.

"I think it's very exciting," the English actor admits. "I never saw the original show, but everyone seems to have loved it. This will be a very different version of that. The same idea -- people come to the island, and they live out their fantasies -- but the approach is different."

Hibbert's previous adventure in Sitcomland was the recurring role of the restaurant critic on Frasier. "It was a wonderful kind of annuity, and I certainly hope it continues," he says.

Still, Hibbert knows -- or hopes he knows -- where his next play is coming from: "There's a play I want to do in New York next summer, and I've been talking to people about it. It's very hush-hush right now. My feeling is I love doing television, but, having done a stint of it, to come back and do theatre whenever I can is very important to me. It's a little like going back to the gym."

-- By Harry Haun


SOURCE:   http://www.playbill.com/news/article/40293.html
m_emerson_news: (Default)


25 Jun 1998

On June 25, Michael Emerson returns to Off-Broadway to play Oscar Wilde, the role he created in the long-running hit, Gross Indecency. In recent months, he has starred in the Moises Kaufman play in San Francisco and then Los Angeles.

On June 25, Michael Emerson returns to Off-Broadway to play Oscar Wilde, the role he created in the long-running hit, Gross Indecency. In recent months, he has starred in the Moises Kaufman play in San Francisco and then Los Angeles.

Gross Indecency, written and directed by Kaufman, also stars Bill Dawes (Lord Alfred), Robert Blumenfeld, James Coyle, John McAdams, Andy Paris, Greg Pierotti, Greg Steinbruner and Don Wildman. Designing the show are Sarah Lambert (sets), Kitty Leech (costumes), Betsy Adams (lighting) and Wayne Frost (sound/original music).

Kaufman's biographical drama won the Lucille Lortel and Outer Critics Circle Award (a tie with Beauty Queen of Leenane) for Best Play. Indecency's international plans are just beginning, what with a Toronto production occurring this month and a London mounting planned for the fall.

For tickets ($29.50-$47.50) and information on Gross Indecency at the Minetta Lane Theatre, 18 Minetta Lane, call (212) 420-8000.

-- By David Lefkowitz

Source:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/39795.html
m_emerson_news: (Default)
10 Nov 1997

He's made a specialty of playing effete but tart-tongued gay men, now Edward Hibbert will get to play the prototype of all those characters: Oscar Wilde himself. Nov. 11, Hibbert replaces the acclaimed Michael Emerson in Moises Kaufman's Off-Broadway hit, Gross Indecency: The Three Trials Of Oscar Wilde.

He's made a specialty of playing effete but tart-tongued gay men, now Edward Hibbert will get to play the prototype of all those characters: Oscar Wilde himself. Nov. 11, Hibbert replaces the acclaimed Michael Emerson in Moises Kaufman's Off-Broadway hit, Gross Indecency: The Three Trials Of Oscar Wilde.

Hibbert's previous stage appearances included Paul Rudnick's Jeffrey and My Night With Reg. He also has a recurring role on television's Frasier.

Emerson isn't giving up Wilde, however; he's starring in the play's first production outside New York. Previews for Gross Indecency at San Francisco's Theatre On The Square are set to begin Nov. 21.

Fueled by an unqualified rave by the New York Times' Ben Brantley, Moises Kaufman's Oscar Wilde deconstruction made the jump from Off-Off Broadway to the larger Minetta Lane Theatre Off-Broadway, June 5. Gross Indecency previously ran to May 4 at the Greenwich House Theatre space on Barrow Street. The show, produced by Tectonic Theatre Project, Inc. (TTP), started performances at the Minetta Lane May 20.

Gross Indecency follows "the arrest, judgment and sentencing of the most celebrated playwright of his time." Directed by Kaufman, the drama makes use of original transcripts and letters, as well as biographical material on Wilde.

The Importance Of Being Earnest may be a staple of theatres around the world, and an An Ideal Husband and Salome have both had recent, star-studded Broadway productions, but in his day, legendary wit Oscar Wilde wasn't quite so well accepted. He was sentenced to two years' hard labor in an English prison for "gross indecency with male persons" -- in other words, the crime of homosexuality. Upon his release, he moved to France and died of meningitis three years later.

Viewers who think Wilde was simply arrested and tried for being gay in England might be surprised at the full story told here: Wilde first sued Lord Queensberry for defamation of character, but the suit backfired, with Wilde becoming the victim of his own pride -- and England's hypocritical legal system.

Appearing with Hibbert in the show are Bill Dawes, John McAdams, Trevor Anthony, Robert Blumenfeld, Troy Sostillio, Andy Paris, Greg Pierotti and Greg Steinbruner. Designers are Sarah Lambert (set), Kitty Leech (costumes), and Betsy Adams (lighting).

According to production spokesperson Kevin McAnarney, playwright Kaufman has received more than a half dozen movie offers despite the fact that two Oscar Wilde movies are already in the pipeline. Regardless of the play's cinematic future, McAnarney predicts a long afterlife for Gross Indecency on the regional theatre circuit, as representatives from a number of major theatres have been making the trek to Minetta Lane to scout out the production." The show has already paid back its $400,000 initial investment. Author/director Kaufman received the Stage Directors & Choreographers Foundation's Joe A. Callaway Award for his work on the show.

TTP, a non-profit group, specializess in plays that "explore theatrical language and form." Their last show, Franz Xaver Kroetz's The Nest (1994), directed by Kaufman, was named "one of the ten best productions of the season" by the Village Voice. (Tectonics is the science or art of construction and also concerns faults and deformations of the earth's crust.)

For tickets ($29.50-$45) and information on Gross Indecency - The Three Trials Of Oscar Wilde at the Minetta Lane Theatre, call (212) 420-8000.

--By David Lefkowitz

Source:  http://www.playbill.com/news/article/35678.html

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